PROTECTION, Eng. A privilege granted by the King to a party to a dispute that protects him from a judgment that would otherwise be rendered against him. There are several types of such safeguards. F. N. B. 65. n. the right of everyone to equal access to the law and justice and to equal treatment of the law and the courts, both in proceedings and in legal matters. It is similar to the right to due process, but applies in particular to equal treatment as an element of fundamental fairness. The most famous case on the subject is Brown v.

Board of Education of Topeka (1954), in which Chief Justice Earl Warren, acting unanimously by the Supreme Court, held that “separate but equal” educational institutions for blacks were inherently unequal and unconstitutional because the segregated school system did not give all students equal rights before the law. It also applies to other inequalities such as pay gaps for equal work or unequal taxation. The principle is enshrined in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution: “No state may. to deny to any person within its jurisdiction the same protection of the law. These sample phrases are automatically selected from various online information sources to reflect the current use of the word “protection”. The views expressed in the examples do not represent the views of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us your feedback. The benefit or security that the government provides to citizens. Merc.

The name of a document, usually issued by notaries to seafarers and others travelling abroad, certifying that the holder named therein is a citizen of the United States. Eng. Law. A privilege granted by the King to a party to a dispute that protects him from a judgment that would otherwise be rendered against him. There are several types of such safeguards. Nglish: Translation of protection for Spanish speakers into English law. An order by which the king, by a special privilege, could privilege a defendant of all personal complaints and many real complaints for one year each, and no longer of all personal complaints and many real complaints, if engaged in his service outside the empire. 3 Bl. Comm. 289. In the past, the name “protection” was also given to a certificate issued to a sailor to show that he was free from interference in the Royal Navy.

In commercial law. The name of a document, usually given by notaries to seafarers and others travelling abroad, certifying that the holder named in the document is a citizen of the United States. In public commercial law. A system by which a government imposes customs duties on goods of foreign origin or manufactured goods when imported into the country, for the purpose and effect of stimulating and expanding domestic production of identical or equivalent goods by preventing the importation of foreign goods or by increasing the price of foreign goods to a certain extent, where domestic producers can compete successfully with them. PROTECTION, mercenaries. The name of a document, usually issued by notaries to seafarers and others travelling abroad, certifying that the holder named therein is a citizen of the United States. PROTECTION, government. That benefit or the security that the government offers to citizens.